How to Remove Acrylic Nails

How to Remove Acrylic Nails


Placing acrylic nails is not recommended for women whose natural nails are of poorer quality. It´s because the acrylic nails can damage even more their natural nails.

Acrylic nails are a very popular beauty supplement, but also a practical way to get rid of the pretty disgusting habits of nail biting. They are also great for those women who want their nails to look nourished and always painted. Without fear that their nail polish will last only two days.

How to Remove Acrylic Nails

If you are tired of your acrylic nails or want to give some break to your natural nails, it is best to go to a beauty salon to get them removed by professional.

But, we all know what it is like when you want something immediately and now, or not to order you to download. In order not to begin to tear your artificial nails yourself, here are some suggestions on how to do it in a painless way at home:

 

Steps to follow:

1. I suppose that you already have all the necessary materials to remove acrylic nails at home. However, if there is anything that you don’t have, you can get them at any cosmetics store or supermarket. Here is a list of everything you need to take off the acrylic nails: polish remover, cotton, acetone, aluminum foil, nail clipper and a nail file.

How to Remove Acrylic Nails

2. First that you need to do before removing the acryl from the nails you should cut it as much as possible. If you notice some difficulty at the time of doing it, it is can be that they are too thick, so we recommend reducing their size by nail file and thus making the removal faster and simpler.

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3. Then mix the acetone with the acrylic enamel remover in a container and immerse your nails in this liquid. Let them stand between 5 and 10 minutes to get the acryl to soften while you clean your nails. Try not to leave them longer than indicated above. Because if you leave them soaked for longer than 10 minutes your skin will irritate. And you can damage your natural nails.

4. When the acrylic become soft, put the cotton ball soaked in acetone and wrapped with small pieces of aluminum foil. You should leave the nail with the aluminum foil paper about 30 minutes, approximately. Don’t worry if you feel a sensation of heat. That means that the treatment is taking effect.

How to Remove Acrylic Nails
Via: TheNailSpa

5. After about half an hour, remove the aluminum foil little by little. If nails become soft enough, it will come out with the paper. Therefore, we recommend not giving a strong pull to avoid hurting yourself.

Further Reading: How to Get Rid of Acne

6. Try to finish the acrylic nails removal by using a stick or spatula. Lift the acrylic from the cuticle little by little. To do this right, the false nail should be soft enough, otherwise, you could hurt yourself. It is about taking off little by little the acrylic nails with the help of a stick or spatula.

How to Remove Acrylic Nails
Via: SheFinds

7. If after removing the acrylic nails there is some glue residue, try to remove it with acetone. You will see that the glue will not be completely removed, so we recommend you scrape the surface of the nail with a stick. But, in case there is still some glue remaining, you can try by gently filing of your nails to finish the cleaning.

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8. Ready! When you finish removing your acrylic nails, wash your hands. Moisturize them with essential oils such as coconut, almond or olive. Olive oil can make some miracles to your nails after torture with acrylic nails. In addition to nourishing them, you will get to give them more shine and to show perfect natural nails.

 


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Bachelor of Philology. Always looks at things from a brighter side and thinks everything comes from the head. She believes that the most important thing is to fulfill time with the people and activities we love. She cannot imagine a day without laughter, cup of tea/coffee and good music.

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